Bugzilla 4.2 will be end of life in November 2015, so if you are thinking of upgrading, then you might want to take a look at Bugzilla 5.0 ( released in July )

You can follow the ‘Installation and Maintenance Guide’ at bugzilla.readthedocs.org or use a configuration template.

If Ansible is your thing, then the repository at bitbucket.org/wrightsolutions/ansible16bugzilla5 can be used to configure an Ubuntu server ( dedicated or cloud )

In ~/hosts.list for Ansible give your server a name such as ‘myubuntu’
and then clone the repository using:

hg clone ssh://hg@bitbucket.org/wrightsolutions/ansible16bugzilla5

From within the local cloned copy you should be able to see site.yml and then run the following:

ansible-playbook site.yml -i ~/hosts.list -u root -l myubuntu

A video demonstration of the automation is available as follows:

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The past 5 years has seen much upheaval in roles and responsibilities within Information Technology.

Business leaders felt that IT was too partitioned (and thus expensive)

The result has been a narrowing of knowledge in individual areas, with a focus now on breadth.

IT - Narrowing and Connecting

Narrowing and Connecting

Phrases such as “The developer is king” reflect this shift.

As with all power shifts, there are upsides and downsides.

Cloud computing was fuelled in part by this shift – that is an upside.

Organisations now have to introduce control processes and checks on developers, some of which it could be argued, are a direct replacement for the partitions between people, in the previous model.

Example: Source code and deployment.

If one person acting alone has full responsibility for source code and deployment, where does that leave the company when the Developer leaves?

Ah, you might argue, but the Developer is a responsible type and pushes to central company controlled repositories and deployment templates.

My question here is “How responsible?”

Surely ‘responsible’ is a sliding scale – some Developers will be more so, some less so.

I was deliberate in using the phrase ‘central company controlled’ when talking about repositories and deployment templates.

Are you a head of IT or company Director? – if so do you know….

  • How granular the access control is on source repositories?
  • How granular the access control is on deployment templates?
  • How many people are sharing the main ‘Owner’ account?
  • The credentials for the ‘Owner’ account?

For the final two points, an argument and counter argument:

But the Head of IT and Directors do not need to access source control, in fact best not have them in there in case they do some damage

Without access to source control, which non-developer have you tasked to act as code keeper on your/company behalf?

This post is providing background for a series of articles – more to follow.

It is always good to know how powerful a new cloud server is, when you take delivery.

There are a range of benchmarks available, however for pure cpu, I like to use some Mathematics.

Programs that tax a processor for several hours, often will be compiled from source.

( Makes sense as if the thing is cpu intensive,
then it really is important for it to be tailored more closely,
to the features available on the underlying host )

Benchmarking with fabric example – hosted on Bitbucket:

The fabric file at the link above, will download the code to your server and run the benchmark.

The image below (click to resize fullscreen) shows the preparatory steps in action as witnessed through the fabric call on the local machine.

benchmarking server from fabric

fabric to benchmark

The Mathematics will run for anywhere between 1 and 15 hours, depending on the raw (single core) processing power on the server being benchmarked.

Fabric availability as standard package

Because Fabric relies on Python 2.5 or newer, you will have to do your own thinking, for CentOS 5 and RedHat 5 (which have python 2.4 by default)

Here is a useful link for Python 2.5 and fabric on rpm based ‘5’ series systems.

Here is a fabric rpm in fedora that assumes a Python version 2.7 or newer.